Archive Page 2

20
Jul
10

Watermelon Pinkberry- Summer in a Cup

I hadn’t been to Pinkberry in quite a while. Molly and I were supposed to go Speed Dating last week but the event was canceled at the last minute. We decided to go shopping instead, have a nice dinner and catch up (stay tuned for the Frankie and Johnny’s post). We went walking up the West Side Highway from West 4th Street to 14th and since it was such a muggy night, we set Pinkberry as our destination. I sampled the watermelon yogurt and although it was absolutely delicious, I stuck with the original flavor. I did change it up, however, as I had strawberry, mochi, and watermelon (instead of blueberries). I was delighted to see that the pricing structure had changed. Toppings are no longer charged individually. The summer special looked awesome, though I’m not sure about the cucumber combo. I’ll try it next time. Anyways, it’s seriously summer in a cup. Go get yourself some!

10
Jun
10

Malcolm Gladwell was Right About Ketchup!

I was reading What the Dog Saw by Malcolm Gladwell.  All of the articles in it were fascinating but the one about ketchup was something I recently experienced when I bought the “No Salt Added” version of Heinz.  The article can be found here on Gladwell dot com.  He starts with the question, “Mustard now comes in dozens of varieties.  Why has ketchup stayed the same?”  In short, he begins by writing about the rise of Grey Poupon and makes his way into the history of ketchup and the market research that ketchup has managed to defy.  Gladwell writes, “The taste of Heinz’s ketchup began at the tip of the tongue, where our receptors for sweet and salty first appear, moved along the sides, where sour notes seem the strongest, then hit the back of the tongue, for umami and bitter, in one long crescendo.  How many things in the supermarket run the sensory spectrum like this?”  All this to say that I tried to be a bit healthier by buying the “No Salt Added” version of Heinz but I was disappointed.  It’s just not the same.  You should read the research that helped get us 36 varieties of Ragú spaghetti sauce.  It’s very interesting.  At least now I know why I don’t like anything that’s not Heinz (the original formula)!  Click here to Splat a friend!

07
Jun
10

Kyochon is the New KFC

Move over Colonel Sanders!  Korean Fried Chicken is all the rage.  I recently visited two different Kyochons.  As far as I know, Bon Chon in K-town and Flushing started the trend.  There is also UFC (Unidentified Flying Chickens) which is also very popular.  What is so special about Korean Fried Chicken?  I’ll try to explain in words but it really must be experienced for yourself.  Sometime I’ll have a blind taste test to see which one of these would win in a throw down.  Let me know if you want in on the taste test!  Double battered and fried wings and drumsticks with various types of glazes.  Although I am fiercely loyal to New York now, I’m sorry but Buffalo Wings have nothing on the new KFC.  The wings come in a non-spicy glaze but to quote my pastor, “Why would you get chicken that wasn’t spicy?”  He also said that compared to Bon Chon, Kyochon tastes more like something his mother would make.  UFC is excellent as well.  Each one suits a different mood.

At the Kyochon in Flushing we had the whole chicken non-spicy and the drumsticks spicy.  They were Spicy (with a capital S).  We also ordered the dukboki with sauteed chicken and onions, simmered in a spicy red sauce.  Below, at the Kyochon in Korea Town on 32nd Street, we had rice balls, miso soup, and pickled daikon radish to accompany the wings.  This Kyochon is hip indeed.  The second level provides seating with plenty of televisions with a lounge feel to it and a great street view.

Hot wings

Oven used at Kyochon (Manhattan)

Rice Ball and Miso Soup

13
May
10

Apple Flavored Soda- Mundet

I found some Apple Soda at the supermarket in Jackson heights. It intrigued me because it said that the flavor comes from the apple. I tried explaining it to my coworkers but they kept calling it apple cider even though I described it as apple juice with carbonation. It is delicious, at any rate, and my coworkers can’t get enough of it.  It also comes in green apple, which is sweeter.

Mundet Apple Flavored Soda

Green Apple Soda

30
Apr
10

Speed Dating at Popburger

I managed to get a friend, Molly, to sign up for speed dating with me.  We signed up for Speed Dating for Christians since faith is a priority for us in our search for potential dates that hopefully lead us to our mates.  I’m debating which part was juicier- the hamburgers or the dates?  We signed up through NY Easy Dates and the event was held at upstairs lounge in Popburger on E. 58th Street, just below the Fifth Avenue Apple Store.  I think that the burgers gave me more satisfaction than the 12 men that I had 6 minutes each with.  If you’ve never participated in speed dating, the women are seated at individual tables and the men rotate around the room and have 6 minutes to talk with each girl.  The facilitator rang her gong at each interval, as she had left her bell at the previous speed dating event.  The fries were battered and addictive.  The sliders were delicious.  Cooked to perfection, they were juicy and tasty.  The buns were nice, hearty and flavorful as well.  We were served the hamburgers and the portobello sliders.  Both were excellent.

As for the dating part, here’s a snippet from the evening:

Molly: So what church do you go to?

Speed Dater: I go to St. Patrick’s.

Molly: Oh, how do you like Father Dolan?

Speed Dater: Who?

While Molly and I left the event feeling somewhat discouraged, I actually did my due diligence and went to the website to choose my matches.  NY Easy Dates only releases or email address if both parties mutually choose each other on the website.  I  ended up with one match!  Now if I can just bring myself to email the guy…

Hmmm, at any rate, I will definitely return to Popburger for a bite sometime.

28
Apr
10

Woorijip (If the Hansons were Korean brothers)

I visited one of my favorite places to get Korean food in K-town/Murray Hill tonight. Delicious prepared Korean food at fast food prices can be had at Woorijip on 32nd Street.  I hadn’t eaten there in quite a few months and was pleasantly surprised to see that they had remodeled.  While still long and narrow, Woorijip seems to have made some extra space for customers to sit.  I have my staples there including various types of kimbap (Korean sushi rolls), japchae (sauteed glass noodles), and jigae (tofu stew).  They have  a hot food line for which you pay by the pound and a hot noodle bar in the back, as well.  I needed something light so I had vegetable kimbap and a cup of spinach and tofu soup.  I had the Hanson song “MMMbop” running through my head.  If they were Korean, they would sing, “Kim-bap…bap, bap, doo-wop” (etc, etc).  Mmmmm.  Yummy.  The names of Korean food fit nicely into the song!  Listen to MMMbop.

23
Apr
10

I Met Bonnie Taub-Dix!

I had the pleasure of meeting Bonnie Taub-Dix, nutritionist and writer, at work the other day.  She was an absolute pleasure to work with.  Even though I was giving her a lesson on the computer, she inspired me during the session.  Her newest book will be released this summer.  She writes for USA Today, among other publications.  Check out her website.  It’s chock full of great information and tips.  I plan on getting a copy of her book when it is released.  It was great timing to have met her when I am still trying to shed those holiday/stress pounds from way back in December!  (Yes, I know that it is already April…don’t remind me!  I guess I should skip the blog entry about the oatmeal pecan cookie I had at Bouchon…)  Write on, fellow foodie!

10
Apr
10

Obscene cookies from Levain Bakery

“Those cookies are downright obscene!”  That’s what Tim said about the cookies from Levain Bakery on the Upper West Side (74th and Amsterdam).  I was in charge of the reception for a set of classical music analysis lectures this year.  I decided to get something special for the reception for the last lecture of the year.  Their cookies come in four varieties and I chose the chocolate chocolate chip.  I brought the leftovers to work the next day and the comment was, “That’s not a cookie, it’s a brownie!” while people’s eyes widened while biting into them.  Don’t get caught up in the technicalities.  The cookies are exceptional.  I tried one of their oatmeal raisin scones, as well.  Mild and delicious, extra scrumptious with jam on top.

Chocolate chocolate chip cookies from Levain Bakery

20
Feb
10

Mona Lisa at McDonald’s

My friends and I actually sought out McDonald’s after shelling out a nice chunk of change for dinner entrees that weren’t proportionate to the amount of food that came on the plate.  We did get to hear a really incredible jazz set by The John Raymond Project but left the joint hungry.  We found a McDonald’s near by and my friend Molly and I took a short detour to find an available ladies room at Le Cirque.  I think the security guards were amused by our desperation and let us use their facility.  After all that, my Happy Meal tasted awfully good.  I also couldn’t resist snapping a photo of the decor.  Did you know that the Mona Lisa ate Mc Donald’s?  Is that how she kept her figure?  Maybe that was her secret…

20
Feb
10

Dumplings on Mosco

One of my favorite places to have dumplings is at a hole in the wall in Chinatown on the teeny tiny Mosco street in Manhattan.  There are two ladies in the tiny place rolling out dough, filling, and cooking dumplings.  It’s a steal at 5 for $1.  You can also buy frozen bags of them so you can cook them at home.  They are seasoned really well and although many “foreigners (lao wai)” (aka Caucasian, or White people) frequent the place, many Chinese people eat there as well.  It is literally a hole in the wall with a counter on the left side of the place to sit and eat at.  I stopped to get dumplings and hot & sour soup for lunch and paid a whopping $2.  As I sat and ate I eavesdropped on the ladies’ conversation.  They didn’t talk about anything extraordinary at that time but I probably would have caught some juicy tidbits had I stuck around a little longer!

20
Feb
10

Dumpling Fest

A recent trip back home to California got me in the same room with an abundance of dumplings.  These were had at a Shanghai-nese restaurant.  We had wontons, pan fried buns (shen jian bao zi), and steamed juicy buns (xiao long bao).

My aunt also made dumplings from scratch for me at my grandmother’s request for the purpose of sending me off with plenty of wishes for prosperity.  The prosperity is wrapped up in the dumplings.  Pictured below are the chive pockets (think Hot Pockets with thinner dough filled with chinese chives, egg, cellophane noodles, and dried shrimp).  Scrump-didli-upmtious!  There’s no place like home.

30
Dec
09

Phö Băng

Yes, there are countless jokes out there about the Vietnamese dish called pho.  The correct pronunciation of it is fuh like fun minus the n.  It is actually a similar pronunciation for a Chinese rice noodle called fun.  In case you haven’t heard any of the jokes, there’s, “What the pho?” and plenty more out there.  Pho is a staple in Southeast Asia.  It’s rice noodles bathed in a spiced beef broth accompanied by various cuts of beef and garnished with bean sprouts, basil, lemon, cilantro, jalapeños and onions.  I always add Sriracha hot sauce into my bowl of pho as well.  Anthony Bourdain once compared his steaming bowl of pho to paradise and I don’t feel that he was far from the truth.  A friend and I ate at a chain called Pho Bang in Chinatown on Mott Street.  There’s also one in Elmhurst that I frequent.  It’s where I go whenever I am craving Vietnamese food.  Delicious pho sure!

19
Nov
09

10¢ Wings at Croxley’s

I don’t normally hang out in Long Island but I decided to join my co-workers for a pre-Thanksgiving Buffalo Wing night at Croxley Ales.  I had been hearing about these famous wing nights and I finally got to experience one.  The evening was preceded by a discussion of the name Buffalo wings.  Without even having any beer the discussion we had was quite ridiculous and I will not recreate it for you here.  I suppose I could Google or Wiki it but perhaps an informed reader can educate me.  Also, I’ve never been to Buffalo so I’ve never had true Buffalo wings, just like I’ve never had a true Philly cheese steak or true Chicago pizza either.   I had a pear cider and then I lost track of the number of wings that I had.  I think I stopped counting on purpose in order to prevent myself from quantifying the guilt!  I loved the hot wings but people ordered mostly mild or medium.  I couldn’t taste the difference between the mild and medium but it didn’t really matter because the bleu cheese sauce prevailed, anyways.  The wings were great, the company was fantastic, and the beers were plentiful.  ‘Twas a great night.

17
Nov
09

Korean BBQ on 35th Street, K-town

I was recently invited to a meal at Madangsui on 35th Street in Midtown.  We sat down to evaluate an event that our team had just executed.  Interestingly enough the event was a discussion around the topic of interracial dating and marriage.  Around the Korean BBQ table we had two Korean-Americans, a Hispanic-American, and a Chinese-American.  Honestly, I thought Chinese-Americans got a hard time from “real Chinese people” for not speaking the language but I discovered that it is even worse for Korean-Americans.  The New York Times recently ran an article about how South Koreans struggle with race.  Abe, who hosted us that night did indeed speak Korean, at least well enough to seemingly win the respect of our waitress.  This is what I love about Chinese and Korean style dining- that family style meal.  The host takes responsibility for ordering for the table.  Needless to say the food was absolutely delicious.  We ordered BBQ chicken with vegetables and Galbi (marinaded short ribs served with onions) with lettuce and sauce to wrap.  They grilled it right at the table for us but luckily I didn’t leave the restaurant smelling like BBQ.  At least I don’t think I did.  We also had fried dumplings, tofu stew and an order of Bibimbop.  They also gave us the ban chan dish of egg in a stone pot (someone please tell me the name of that one!).

17
Nov
09

NYC’s anti-soda campaign

01fat_190

Subway Campaign

Have you seen these ads on the subway?  The NY Times published an article about this recent campaign talking about the controversy over them.  I’ve recently entered at Fatbet with some co-workers and it has forced me to reconsider the choices that I make in my diet.  I’m brought back to my high school days when we had health as a topic for a week for PhysEd class.  The teacher tried to explain the concept of empty calories to us.  This was during the time when fat free foods made their explosion onto the market.  Another voice ringing in my head is that of my mother’s, who was always telling me not to drink soda.  All this information clicked with me a few years back when I was living in China, with Coca Cola as one of my few American staples that I could rely on getting abroad cheaply and easily.  My friend who worked at Amnesty International challenged me to give up Coke and Nestle products in order to protest the evils of globalization.  As reluctantly as I did give up Coke products for 6 months (she couldn’t convince me to give up Nestle products, though, because they were the only ones making American style breakfast cereal at the time), I had an epiphany.  My body really didn’t need the rush of 240 calories from pure sugar.  The empty calories were equaling fat, exactly the way it is portrayed in the NYC subway campaign.  Of course, anything is permissible in moderation.  This brings me back to the Fatbet.  People inevitably frown at me when they see me eating a cookie or anything slightly unhealthy.  And drinking empty calories is not evil, it just needs to be moderated.  If you drink a bottle of coke and you’re on a 1700 calorie per day diet, that’s one seventh of your daily allotted calories.  And diet drinks aren’t a good alternative.  According to my friend’s dietician, your body does actually need and crave sugar.  If you use a sugar substitute, your body will still crave actual sugar so it is best to use real sugar, but sparingly and in moderation.  What I learned from my previous Fatbet was not to unknowingly drink your calories.  Sports drinks, sodas, sugar and cream, “enhanced” waters all add up.  And they can add up to fat.

03
Nov
09

Pinkberry

I was introduced to the phenomenon of Pinkberry while working in Midtown.  My colleagues and I would walk to 32nd street to get a fix of this frozen yogurt.  And I really mean frozen yogurt- yogurt that is frozen, not an unsatisfying substitute for ice cream.  My usual Pinkberry order is original or green tea yogurt with berries and mochi.  My friend Dave and I stopped in at Pinkberry before our friend’s performance on Theatre Row.  I decided to try the Pinkberry Parfait because it looked so pretty.

Pinkberry Parfait

Pinkberry Parfait

If you are wondering if the word phenomenon is an overstatement for a frozen yogurt product, you can read about it in the LA Times.  Pinkberry has become a staple in many Manhattan neighborhoods.  You’ll probably see me in line one of these days.

18
Sep
09

A Classical McDonald’s

There’s no playground at the McDonald’s on 56th and 8th Ave but Molly and I walked into this one and were struck by the decor and the classical music playing over the loudspeakers.  There were prints of classical looking paintings (insert comment by Art History majors here) on the walls, across from the giant Angus Burger signs.  I would have taken some pictures but I had an ice cream cone in my hand.  They’re only 150 calories, by the way.  No Less guilt!   If you’re in need of a little zen, stop by Mikkee Dee’s.

11
Sep
09

Gettin’ Jigae With It

One of the best parts of Midtown is K-town (Korea town) on 32nd Street, or I suppose it is more Murray Hill.  After a meeting in Midtown, I met some friends at Seoul Garden for dinner to celebrate my new job!  They specialize in Korean BBQ and natural tofu (Jigae).   We decided not to do the BBQ that night mostly because I was feeling lazy and didn’t feel like grilling my own meat at the table.  We ordered a couple of appetizers: the beef dumplings (Mandoo) and the seafood pancake (Pajun) and a couple of entrees: tofu stew (Jigae) and the marinated short ribs (Galbi).  Of course the dinner was accompanied by the traditional side dishes (Ban Chan).  There was Kim Chi, seaweed, fish, string beans, bean sprouts, and a particularly tasty zucchini/egg dish that I never had before.  Dinner was really calm and relaxing until a party of 20 was seated next to us.  Luckily we were finished by then and made our exit.  I’ve eaten more Korean food in 4 years in New York than I have during all the rest of my life.  I love gettin’ Jigae with it!   [Listen to Will Smith]

Seoul Garden

Seoul Garden

09
Sep
09

Flushing- Sago

Sago Tea Cafe on Main Street in Flushing serves appetizers, rice, and noodle dishes along with bubble tea (aka pearl tea or boba).  They also have a Korean food menu.  Instead of having my usual almond milk tea or green tea smoothie, I tried the Fried Green Tea Ice Cream as I caught up with friends.  Joe’s Bestburger is right across the street they have a half price deal for their Rewards Card members a couple hours before closing.  My friend Sam was recommending the chicken sandwich, claiming that it is better than Chick-fil-a.  I tried holding out until 10pm to have dinner but I didn’t make it.  I had Burger King instead.  Hardly interesting at all.  My model/actor friend Jay gave me his rewards card to Joe’s Bestburger so I’ll make it there sometime soon.

31
Aug
09

Sanur Indonesian and Malaysian

Sanur in Chinatown

Sanur in Chinatown

I was in desperate need of company after a couple weeks of not seeing any friends.  Diana and I were going to have dinner with Kai, a guy.  I told him that we were going to take him to Alice’s Teacup and he said that was fine with him!  We couldn’t do that to him in good conscience, though.  We ended up at Sanur in Chinatown where the food is good and cheap.  You have to go downstairs to be seated.  We ate family style, of course.  We had seafood soup (hot and sour), curried beef with potatoes, Yang Chow fried rice, Roti Canai, and Mee Rebus, which is a spicy noodle dish with vegetables, egg, and potatoes.  Kai is a chef and gave it a positive review.  Well, he picked the restaurant so he’d better give it a good review!  It was a highly satisfying dinner for the palette as well as the fuel tank.

Curry Beef, Yang Chow Fried Rice, Roti Canai

Curry Beef, Yang Chow Fried Rice, Roti Canai

Soup and Mee Rebus

Soup and Mee Rebus




View Categories

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3 other followers


%d bloggers like this: